C*


captain-majed:

lantern slides taken by British general Percy Sykes in Iran ~1906-1909

(via poppoppopblowblowbubblegum)

— 1 day ago with 85 notes
guernicamag:

Nothing More to Lose, Najwan Darwish’s lyrical poetry collection published by New York Review of Books and translated by the half-American and half-Egyptian Kareem James Abu-Zeid, exemplifies everything we hope for from a poetry translation. Abu-Zeid has carefully considered every word and linguistic detail, examined the tone, rhythm and music of each poem. The result is poetry that holds the same haunting intelligence in English as in Arabic, a book that cleverly incites readers to ponder the meaning behind its title in every poem. Kareem James Abu-Zeid: A Search for Justice and Expansive Identities - Guernica / A Magazine of Art & PoliticsIllustration by Annelise Capossela.

guernicamag:

Nothing More to Lose, Najwan Darwish’s lyrical poetry collection published by New York Review of Books and translated by the half-American and half-Egyptian Kareem James Abu-Zeid, exemplifies everything we hope for from a poetry translation. Abu-Zeid has carefully considered every word and linguistic detail, examined the tone, rhythm and music of each poem. The result is poetry that holds the same haunting intelligence in English as in Arabic, a book that cleverly incites readers to ponder the meaning behind its title in every poem.

Kareem James Abu-Zeid: A Search for Justice and Expansive Identities - Guernica / A Magazine of Art & Politics

Illustration by Annelise Capossela.

— 3 days ago with 33 notes

mashallahblog:

"Of Course Mona, Harara, Blue Bra Lady, Emad" 
Screenprints by Ganzeer
ganzeerism
:

Four screenprints I designed in Cairo sometime in 2013, screenprinted by Kevin Caplicki in Brooklyn at Bushwick Print Lab.

Top image - from left to right:

Title: Of Course, Mona
Edition: 30 
Dimensions: 19x25 Inches
Media: screenprint on paper
Description: “Of course the army has protected the revolution” is juxtaposed against an image of Mona Eltahawy, an Egyptian-American journalist, who was sexually assaulted and had both her arms broken by Egyptian Riot police during a protest against military rule in November 2011.

Title: Of Course, Harara
Edition: 30 
Dimensions: 19x25 Inches
Media: screenprint on paper
Description: “Of course the army has protected the revolution,” a sentence much propagated by the Egyptian regime since the fall of Mubarak is juxtaposed against a portrait of Ahmed Harara, an Egyptian protestor who lost an eye to a bullet on January 28th, 2011, and the other eye during anti-military protests-become-clashes near the Ministry of Interiors on November 19, 2011, a day known as the Battle of the Eyes of Freedom where many protestors lost their eyes to a police sniper.

Title: Of Course, Blue Bra Lady
Edition: 30 (depicted above is a version hand-colored with blue and pink highlights)
Dimensions: 19x25 Inches
Media: screenprint on paper
Description: The text reads “Of course the army has protected the revolution.” This sentence, regularly propagated by the Egyptian regime since the spark of the Egyptian revolution is juxtaposed against the backdrop of one protestor who’s gotten a taste of that protection first hand. Known as “The Blue Bra Girl,” this woman was unclothed, and severely kicked and beaten by several Military Police officers during a protest on December 17th, 2011 calling on the illegitimacy of Egyptian Parliament.

Title: Of Course, Emad
Edition: 30 
Dimensions: 19x25 Inches
Media: screenprint on paper
Description: Sheikh Emad Effat, an Al-Azhar University Senior, was shot dead during a massive anti-parliament/anti-military protest on December 17, 2011. This, by the way, at a time when the Muslim Brotherhood was supportive of the military and had managed to dominate parliament. Sheikh Emad’s portrait is juxtaposed against a sentence commonly propagated by the regime in Egypt: “Of course the army protected the revolution.”

— 3 days ago with 43 notes

lastuli:

Gaza, 1988 by Robert Croma

Wherever I went in the West Bank and Gaza Strip in 1988, Palestinian children spontaneously gave ‘V’ signs in response to my camera.

It should be noted that these images are a blow-up of contact prints as Croma no longer has access to his original negatives.

More photographs from the First Intifada by Rober Croma here.

(via poppoppopblowblowbubblegum)

— 3 days ago with 1038 notes

mashallahblog:

A dose of optimism from Syrian artist Fares Cachoux : Top: “Damascus will become colorful again.” Bottom: “Homs will become colorful again.”

— 6 days ago with 32 notes
cairospirit:

Cairospirit visits Tunisia. Medina of Kerouan

cairospirit:

Cairospirit visits Tunisia.
Medina of Kerouan

— 2 weeks ago with 2 notes

cairospirit:

Cairospirit in Tunisia
Medina of Kerouan

— 2 weeks ago with 1806 notes

art-of-swords:

Sabre with undulated blade

  • Dated: 19th century
  • Culture: Indopersian
  • Measurements: overall length 76 cm

The sword has a large, undulated, double-edged, damask blade, ribbed at the centre, with a double fuller on the entire length except for the tip, which is slightly thicker. Apparently the blade is quite unusual.

The iron grip, of almost elliptical section, features a beak-shaped pommel bent on a side. The surface of the grip is decorated with silver-inlaid floral motifs and geometrical frames. The pommel has a relieved rosette on both faces.

Source: Copyright © 2014 Czerny’s International Auction House S.R.L.

— 2 weeks ago with 1589 notes